The Somme 100 Years on

Somme The Battle of the Somme took place between 1st July and 18th November 1916. It was a British and French offensive against German trenches that had been occupied and strengthen for the best part of the 2 years leading up to it.

Over the top

It was a complete disaster with nearly a million casualties on both sides by its end. The first day of the Somme remains the worst day in the history of the British Army with 20,000 killed and nearly 40,000 wounded, taken prisoner or missing.

Documentary

It was intended to hasten the end of the war with a breakthrough of the German Trenches. However, all the land gained on the first day was quickly lost to German counter attacks. The battle achieved nothing of any military value.

Wikipedia

The Battle has gone down both in history and folklore as one of the most dreadful days in the nations history. At the time most people back home would have known at least one of the soldier killed in the battle. The last veteran of the war died in 2012 at the ripe old age of 110. So why do we need to remember what happened so long ago?

9 ex-pupils of Nottingham High School remembered

The truth is that history has a nasty habit of repeating itself. It is also the only way we have of understanding who we are and why certain things happen the way they do. The First World War or the Great War as it was originally know was the truly first industrial war. The great European nations had developed massive industrial capabilities. They were also lock in a race to create and protect some of the largest empires the world had ever know. It was also a time when people did as they were told. This all added up to a time when the British Army could send 1,000 of poorly trained and equipped men over the top to face machine gun fire. Loose 60,000 and do it again the next day and the next and the next.

Sherwood Foresters at the Somme

We must remember it because it cannot be allowed to happen again. We must remember because it teaches us to question those who give out orders. We must remember to remind us of the value of life and the pointlessness of war.

Those from Sutton-in-Ashfield who died in WW1

Account of the battle from a Mansfield Solidier

Somme App

Oh My Nottz is a HotHouse Theatre production. Co. No. 6505843 Charity No. 1154523. Tel 07963020259 email guy@hothousetheatre.com website www.hothousetheatre.com